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Vocab!

ab·sti·nence
Pronunciation: 'ab-st&-n&n(t)s
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin abstinentia, from abstinent-, abstinens, present participle of abstinEre
Date: 14th century
1 : voluntary forbearance especially from indulgence of an appetite or craving or from eating some foods : ABSTENTION
2 : habitual abstaining from intoxicating beverages
- ab·sti·nent /-n&nt/ adjective
- ab·sti·nent·ly adverb

ex·ten·u·a·tion
Pronunciation: ik-"sten-y&-'wA-sh&n
Function: noun
Date: circa 1543
1 : the act of extenuating or state of being extenuated; especially : partial justification
2 : something extenuating; especially : a partial excuse

por·tent
Pronunciation: 'por-"tent, 'pOr-
Function: noun
Etymology: Latin portentum, from neuter of portentus, past participle of portendere
Date: circa 1587
1 : something that foreshadows a coming event : OMEN
2 : prophetic indication or significance
3 : MARVEL, PRODIGY

pre·ten·tious
Pronunciation: pri-'ten(t)-sh&s
Function: adjective
Etymology: French prétentieux, from prétention pretension, from Medieval Latin praetention-, praetentio, from Latin praetendere
Date: 1837
1 : characterized by pretension: as a : making usually unjustified or excessive claims (as of value or standing) b : expressive of affected, unwarranted, or exaggerated importance, worth, or stature
2 : making demands on one's skill, ability, or means : AMBITIOUS
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ab·sti·nence
Pronunciation: 'ab-st&-n&n(t)s
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin abstinentia, from abstinent-, abstinens, present participle of abstinEre
Date: 14th century
1 : voluntary forbearance especially from indulgence of an appetite or craving or from eating some foods : ABSTENTION
2 : habitual abstaining from intoxicating beverages
- ab·sti·nent /-n&nt/ adjective
- ab·sti·nent·ly adverb

ex·ten·u·a·tion
Pronunciation: ik-"sten-y&-'wA-sh&n
Function: noun
Date: circa 1543
1 : the act of extenuating or state of being extenuated; especially : partial justification
2 : something extenuating; especially : a partial excuse

por·tent
Pronunciation: 'por-"tent, 'pOr-
Function: noun
Etymology: Latin portentum, from neuter of portentus, past participle of portendere
Date: circa 1587
1 : something that foreshadows a coming event : OMEN
2 : prophetic indication or significance
3 : MARVEL, PRODIGY

pre·ten·tious
Pronunciation: pri-'ten(t)-sh&s
Function: adjective
Etymology: French prétentieux, from prétention pretension, from Medieval Latin praetention-, praetentio, from Latin praetendere
Date: 1837
1 : characterized by pretension: as a : making usually unjustified or excessive claims (as of value or standing) <the pretentious fraud who assumes a love of culture that is alien to him -- Richard Watts> b : expressive of affected, unwarranted, or exaggerated importance, worth, or stature <pretentious language> <pretentious houses>
2 : making demands on one's skill, ability, or means : AMBITIOUS <the pretentious daring of the Green Mountain Boys in crossing the lake -- Amer. Guide Series: Vt.>
synonym see SHOWY
- pre·ten·tious·ly adverb
- pre·ten·tious·ness noun

ret·i·nue
Pronunciation: 're-t&n-"ü, -"yü
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English retenue, from Middle French, from feminine of retenu, past participle of retenir to retain
Date: 14th century
: a group of retainers or attendants

ten·a·ble
Pronunciation: 'te-n&-b&l
Function: adjective
Etymology: Middle French, from Old French, from tenir to hold, from Latin tenEre -- more at THIN
Date: 1579
: capable of being held, maintained, or defended : DEFENSIBLE, REASONABLE
- ten·a·bil·i·ty /"te-n&-'bi-l&-tE/ noun
- ten·a·ble·ness noun
- ten·a·bly /'te-n&-blE/ adverb

te·na·cious
Pronunciation: t&-'nA-sh&s
Function: adjective
Etymology: Latin tenac-, tenax tending to hold fast, from tenEre to hold
Date: 1607
1 a : not easily pulled apart : COHESIVE <a tenacious metal> b : tending to adhere or cling especially to another substance <tenacious burs>
2 a : persistent in maintaining or adhering to something valued or habitual <a tenacious royalist> b : RETENTIVE <a tenacious memory>
synonym see STRONG
- te·na·ci·ous·ly adverb
- te·na·cious·ness noun

1ten·ant
Pronunciation: 'te-n&nt
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from present participle of tenir to hold
Date: 14th century
1 a : one who holds or possesses real estate or sometimes personal property (as an annuity) by any kind of right b : one who has the occupation or temporary possession of lands or tenements of another; specifically : one who rents or leases (as a house) from a landlord
2 : OCCUPANT, DWELLER
- ten·ant·less /-l&s/ adjective

2tenant
Function: transitive verb
Date: 1634
: to hold or occupy as a tenant : INHABIT
- ten·ant·able /-n&n-t&-b&l/ adjective

ten·u·ous
Pronunciation: 'ten-y&-w&s
Function: adjective
Etymology: Latin tenuis thin, slight, tenuous -- more at THIN
Date: 1597
1 : not dense : RARE <a tenuous fluid>
2 : not thick : SLENDER <a tenuous rope>
3 a : having little substance or strength : FLIMSY, WEAK <tenuous influences> b : SHAKY 2a <tenuous reasons> <on grounds that were tenuous>
synonym see THIN
- ten·u·ous·ly adverb
- ten·u·ous·ness noun

ten·ure
Pronunciation: 'ten-y&r also -"yur
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French teneüre, tenure, from Medieval Latin tenitura, from (assumed) Vulgar Latin tenitus, past participle of Latin tenEre to hold -- more at THIN
Date: 15th century
1 : the act, right, manner, or term of holding something (as a landed property, a position, or an office); especially : a status granted after a trial period to a teacher that gives protection from summary dismissal
2 : GRASP, HOLD
- ten·ur·able /-&-b&l/ adjective
- te·nur·ial /te-'nyur-E-&l/ adjective
- te·nur·ial·ly /-&-lE/ adverb
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